Creating Bite-size User-generated Video that Delivers Results: Your 60 Seconds Start Now

dreamstime_xs_50992278I’ve written before about the rise in popularity of video-based learning.  Over the last few years, I’ve seen a rapid increase in the use of both professionally developed and informally produced video content.  At first I was helped along by the wide availability of camcorders and flip-cams.  But over the last two years in particular, the smartphone has become the video-recording tool of choice for many inside and outside of the L&D profession.

At the same time, as the concepts of social and informal learning have been adopted by organisations, the potential to grow the use of user-generated content (UGC) has arisen and excited those in L&D, keen to capture more of the knowledge retained in the heads of employees that would deliver greater value if more widely shared.

But motivating employees to create content is seen as a challenge that might hinder the use of UGC.  If employees see this as a daunting prospect, then all the potential advantages will be lost.  What can we do to realise our ambitions here and what are the implications for learning design and quality? Continue reading “Creating Bite-size User-generated Video that Delivers Results: Your 60 Seconds Start Now”

Creating Bite-size User-generated Video that Delivers Results: Your 60 Seconds Start Now

What’s in Your Learning Playlist?

dreamstime_xs_27207411Early in December, an article in the UK’s i newspaper got me thinking.

Music professor, Mike Errico asked whether the three-minute song had run its course.  He noted that:

Spotify data from 2014 suggests that 24.14 per cent of listeners will skip a song within the first five seconds, and the chances that they will listen through to the end is about 50:50.

Songwriter, Mark Christopher Lee read Errico’s piece and decided to test this out and produced an album of 100 tracks, each about 30 seconds in length. Continue reading “What’s in Your Learning Playlist?”

What’s in Your Learning Playlist?

Micro-learning Under the Microscope

dreamstime_xs_47119176This is the time of year when we’re often asked to make predictions about learning trends in the forthcoming year.  I’m sure that one of the concepts we’re going to hear a lot more about is micro-learning.  I’m also sure that the more sceptical in the profession are already raising their eyebrows and muttering “not another buzzword”.  And to a degree, I can understand that.  Firstly, I think we’ve long strived to make learning as short and as punchy as possible.  I certainly began this crusade some seven years ago.  So why are we now trying to give it its own label?  And secondly, over the last few months, one or two training providers have clearing used their marketing communications to create “noise” about micro-learning that is all about describing their own solution.  But is it right that a vendor’s solution defines the approach? Continue reading “Micro-learning Under the Microscope”

Micro-learning Under the Microscope

The Wherewithal with Wearables

dreamstime_xs_49481214When all the chatter first started about the then forthcoming Apple Watch, my mind immediately turned to how wearable devices could be “next big thing” in digital learning.  I started to visualise scenarios of engineers, perched high in precarious places, looking to their wrist for helpful instructions about what they should do next.  Then one of my technology partners reminded me that you needed to have your iPhone nearby and that it wouldn’t really offer much without that connected device.  A valid point.  In your average scenario, if having to choose between the tiny watch screen and the larger one on my smartphone, most people would realistically choose the latter.  So I stopped thinking about wearables.

Continue reading “The Wherewithal with Wearables”

The Wherewithal with Wearables

Using video to support the learning cycle

dreamstime_xs_50992278It’s been said that we are a generation of YouTubers and it is quite literally possible to learn just about anything from an online video.  Long gone are the days when the corporate L&D world had to rely on a small number of “classic” generic video tapes procured from two or three providers who dominated this market.  Gone too are the times when you’d set the video playing and leave the room for 30 minutes to get on with something else, then return with the crib sheet from the video vendor’s trainer’s guide.  Well at least I hope so.  And no longer do you have to spend Hollywood level amounts to commission bespoke video.  Back in 1996, a five-minute video cost me a staggering £25,000.

Continue reading “Using video to support the learning cycle”

Using video to support the learning cycle