Personalising learning – the good old way

dreamstime_xs_51966497Learning personalisation is one of the latest trends to emerge in the L&D industry and increasingly it’s promoted alongside the use of AI and machine learning which is “set to transform learning” according to the marketing blurb.  But the majority of L&D departments are still some way off embracing these technologies.  We are still wrestling with the technology we already have, have no budget or appetite to add even more systems to the mix and are still working on getting the basics right.  While AI and machine learning may well disrupt the industry in time, what pragmatic steps can we take now to offer each learner a personalised learning experience? Continue reading “Personalising learning – the good old way”

Personalising learning – the good old way

Rethinking compliance training

dreamstime_xs_84033412Love it or loathe it, most of us in L&D will get involved at some time with the design and deployment of compliance training for our organisations.  It’s often the first learning that a new starter experiences and the one piece of learning that distracts all employees every year or so when it comes to refresher time.  Gradually, over time, more and more stakeholders in the organisation believe that their part of the business must have some of its own compliance training that seemingly everyone in the business needs to do.  Eventually, compliance training turns into a mammoth of a beast that consumes extraordinarily large amounts of time and with what results?

“Only 26% think online compliance training is effective” (“The state of compliance training today”, Filtered, 2017)

But it can – and should be – very different. Continue reading “Rethinking compliance training”

Rethinking compliance training

Muddling Through Mobile

dreamstime_xs_52738328Slowly but steadily, mobile learning seems to be a part of our learning landscape.  Over the last seven years, I’ve formed a strong opinion that mobile learning will eventually be a game-changer in our industry.  If you have a smartphone-equipped audience, then I do urge you to look at how you can add it to your learning delivery channels.  Not only can it really transform your delivery of formal learning, increasingly I’m realising how it can also be a critical enabling factor for both social and informal learning.

But I also know that we are still at that point in time when the technology options are numerous and the application of mobile learning can take many different forms.  I can quite understand if you’re hesitating to make your first moves in this area.  With every wave of new learning technology, it can take a while for things to settle down.  So how can we make sense of the current mobile learning muddle? Continue reading “Muddling Through Mobile”

Muddling Through Mobile

What’s in Your Learning Playlist?

dreamstime_xs_27207411Early in December, an article in the UK’s i newspaper got me thinking.

Music professor, Mike Errico asked whether the three-minute song had run its course.  He noted that:

Spotify data from 2014 suggests that 24.14 per cent of listeners will skip a song within the first five seconds, and the chances that they will listen through to the end is about 50:50.

Songwriter, Mark Christopher Lee read Errico’s piece and decided to test this out and produced an album of 100 tracks, each about 30 seconds in length. Continue reading “What’s in Your Learning Playlist?”

What’s in Your Learning Playlist?

The Future of the Learning Management System

dreamstime_xs_50731317Over the last few days, I’ve had a number of conversations where I was asked for my thoughts about the future of the learning management system (LMS).  I know many of us have a love-hate relationship with our chosen system.  We all know we need to have one, we’re happy with our process for choosing the one we had – and the reasons for choosing it – but we still then have the odd moan or two about it once it’s live and in active use.  And then we start talking with others and begin to wonder what we should do when the current contract is up for renewal.  We want to make sure that the renewal is future-proof.  But what is that future?  Here are my thoughts. Continue reading “The Future of the Learning Management System”

The Future of the Learning Management System

Learning to Lead – The Digital Potential – My Commentary

dreamstime_xs_55894278As an Associate of the Institute of Consulting – an organisation within the Chartered Management Institute (CMI), who authored this report, “Learning to Lead.  The Digital Potential”,  I hope the report’s authors will approve me penning some of my own thoughts based on their recent research, particularly as my two L&D passions are digital learning and leadership and management development.  And, of course, I recently shared my own thoughts on using digital learning for executive development. Continue reading “Learning to Lead – The Digital Potential – My Commentary”

Learning to Lead – The Digital Potential – My Commentary

Micro-learning Under the Microscope

dreamstime_xs_47119176This is the time of year when we’re often asked to make predictions about learning trends in the forthcoming year.  I’m sure that one of the concepts we’re going to hear a lot more about is micro-learning.  I’m also sure that the more sceptical in the profession are already raising their eyebrows and muttering “not another buzzword”.  And to a degree, I can understand that.  Firstly, I think we’ve long strived to make learning as short and as punchy as possible.  I certainly began this crusade some seven years ago.  So why are we now trying to give it its own label?  And secondly, over the last few months, one or two training providers have clearing used their marketing communications to create “noise” about micro-learning that is all about describing their own solution.  But is it right that a vendor’s solution defines the approach? Continue reading “Micro-learning Under the Microscope”

Micro-learning Under the Microscope

Designing “Mobile First” Learning Content

dreamstime_m_36899365 (2)Over the last few years, I’ve become a strong proponent of moving towards “mobile” first learning strategies.  This is – to a large degree – as a result of the observations I’ve made about how the world of workplace learning is changing and how the use of mobile devices continues to grow, giving us the platforms we need to start to make mobile learning and performance support a reality.

There are two elements to a “mobile first” strategy.  The first – which I will definitely come back to another day – is the development of complete programmes of learning with a significant use of mobile content and a move away from desktop based e-learning and content-packed live sessions.  The second element – and the aspect I will address in this post – is actually designing content that supports a “mobile first” philosophy. Continue reading “Designing “Mobile First” Learning Content”

Designing “Mobile First” Learning Content

The Wherewithal with Wearables

dreamstime_xs_49481214When all the chatter first started about the then forthcoming Apple Watch, my mind immediately turned to how wearable devices could be “next big thing” in digital learning.  I started to visualise scenarios of engineers, perched high in precarious places, looking to their wrist for helpful instructions about what they should do next.  Then one of my technology partners reminded me that you needed to have your iPhone nearby and that it wouldn’t really offer much without that connected device.  A valid point.  In your average scenario, if having to choose between the tiny watch screen and the larger one on my smartphone, most people would realistically choose the latter.  So I stopped thinking about wearables.

Continue reading “The Wherewithal with Wearables”

The Wherewithal with Wearables

Using video to support the learning cycle

dreamstime_xs_50992278It’s been said that we are a generation of YouTubers and it is quite literally possible to learn just about anything from an online video.  Long gone are the days when the corporate L&D world had to rely on a small number of “classic” generic video tapes procured from two or three providers who dominated this market.  Gone too are the times when you’d set the video playing and leave the room for 30 minutes to get on with something else, then return with the crib sheet from the video vendor’s trainer’s guide.  Well at least I hope so.  And no longer do you have to spend Hollywood level amounts to commission bespoke video.  Back in 1996, a five-minute video cost me a staggering £25,000.

Continue reading “Using video to support the learning cycle”

Using video to support the learning cycle