Rethinking compliance training

dreamstime_xs_84033412Love it or loathe it, most of us in L&D will get involved at some time with the design and deployment of compliance training for our organisations.  It’s often the first learning that a new starter experiences and the one piece of learning that distracts all employees every year or so when it comes to refresher time.  Gradually, over time, more and more stakeholders in the organisation believe that their part of the business must have some of its own compliance training that seemingly everyone in the business needs to do.  Eventually, compliance training turns into a mammoth of a beast that consumes extraordinarily large amounts of time and with what results?

“Only 26% think online compliance training is effective” (“The state of compliance training today”, Filtered, 2017)

But it can – and should be – very different. Continue reading “Rethinking compliance training”

Rethinking compliance training

Creating Bite-size User-generated Video that Delivers Results: Your 60 Seconds Start Now

dreamstime_xs_50992278I’ve written before about the rise in popularity of video-based learning.  Over the last few years, I’ve seen a rapid increase in the use of both professionally developed and informally produced video content.  At first I was helped along by the wide availability of camcorders and flip-cams.  But over the last two years in particular, the smartphone has become the video-recording tool of choice for many inside and outside of the L&D profession.

At the same time, as the concepts of social and informal learning have been adopted by organisations, the potential to grow the use of user-generated content (UGC) has arisen and excited those in L&D, keen to capture more of the knowledge retained in the heads of employees that would deliver greater value if more widely shared.

But motivating employees to create content is seen as a challenge that might hinder the use of UGC.  If employees see this as a daunting prospect, then all the potential advantages will be lost.  What can we do to realise our ambitions here and what are the implications for learning design and quality? Continue reading “Creating Bite-size User-generated Video that Delivers Results: Your 60 Seconds Start Now”

Creating Bite-size User-generated Video that Delivers Results: Your 60 Seconds Start Now

Using social and informal learning to meet the five moments of learning need

dreamstime_xs_58382160As I’ve been talking to fellow L&D professionals about their thoughts around social and informal learning – specifically about how they plan on formally integrating these approaches into their learning strategies – it’s been clear to me that there is much excitement about the potential of these methodologies to significantly increase L&D’s capability to support the business.

One of the barriers – if that’s the appropriate word – is the fact that learners don’t necessarily recognise these approaches as “training” and so neglect to make the most of them.  The feeling is that by educating people as to the validity of social and informal learning, there is much scope to use these methods to better leverage workplace learning.

If we are looking to give our learners some pointers to get them started, then perhaps we can look at the “five moments of learning need” framework as our model. Continue reading “Using social and informal learning to meet the five moments of learning need”

Using social and informal learning to meet the five moments of learning need

Muddling Through Mobile

dreamstime_xs_52738328Slowly but steadily, mobile learning seems to be a part of our learning landscape.  Over the last seven years, I’ve formed a strong opinion that mobile learning will eventually be a game-changer in our industry.  If you have a smartphone-equipped audience, then I do urge you to look at how you can add it to your learning delivery channels.  Not only can it really transform your delivery of formal learning, increasingly I’m realising how it can also be a critical enabling factor for both social and informal learning.

But I also know that we are still at that point in time when the technology options are numerous and the application of mobile learning can take many different forms.  I can quite understand if you’re hesitating to make your first moves in this area.  With every wave of new learning technology, it can take a while for things to settle down.  So how can we make sense of the current mobile learning muddle? Continue reading “Muddling Through Mobile”

Muddling Through Mobile

Using Micro-learning to Affect Behaviour Change

dreamstime_xs_51349296I’ve recently had a number of interesting conversations about whether micro-learning – one of this year’s big talking points – could really support behavioural change training.  Most people seemed comfortable that it would be good for pure knowledge transfer, but questioned whether it would support behavioural change, where typically we’ve invested in more complete and deeper programmes of learning, be that online or in the classroom.

I genuinely believe it has a valuable role to play in this area. Continue reading “Using Micro-learning to Affect Behaviour Change”

Using Micro-learning to Affect Behaviour Change

Ask. Search. Learn.

dreamstime_xs_55039048I’ve written before about how we need to consider how our learners prefer to learn when designing our learning solutions.  In that piece I concentrated on the amount of effort each learner chooses to put in.

Whilst walking around last week’s Learning Technologies Exhibition in London, the constant referencing to 70:20:10 got me thinking about how we can make sense of that in our organisations and incorporate it into our learning strategies.   After all, informal and social learning is nothing new – and some may argue as it’s been doing all right on its own up to now, why should we even attempt to manage it (or worst case formalise it) – but it got me thinking about how informal, social and formal learning are core components of a learner’s journey.

Continue reading “Ask. Search. Learn.”

Ask. Search. Learn.

The Secret Life of UK Managers – My Commentary

dreamstime_xs_55894278GoodPractice, in association with ComRes, have examined how 500 managers prefer to learn and their thoughts on the learning they receive.  The report’s authors have asked for the opinions of its readers, so here are mine.

In the introduction to the report it states that:

“70% of L&D professionals don’t research how their learners currently learn or what they need to do their job.”

Continue reading “The Secret Life of UK Managers – My Commentary”

The Secret Life of UK Managers – My Commentary