Ask. Search. Learn.

dreamstime_xs_55039048I’ve written before about how we need to consider how our learners prefer to learn when designing our learning solutions.  In that piece I concentrated on the amount of effort each learner chooses to put in.

Whilst walking around last week’s Learning Technologies Exhibition in London, the constant referencing to 70:20:10 got me thinking about how we can make sense of that in our organisations and incorporate it into our learning strategies.   After all, informal and social learning is nothing new – and some may argue as it’s been doing all right on its own up to now, why should we even attempt to manage it (or worst case formalise it) – but it got me thinking about how informal, social and formal learning are core components of a learner’s journey.

Continue reading “Ask. Search. Learn.”

Ask. Search. Learn.

The Future of the Learning Management System

dreamstime_xs_50731317Over the last few days, I’ve had a number of conversations where I was asked for my thoughts about the future of the learning management system (LMS).  I know many of us have a love-hate relationship with our chosen system.  We all know we need to have one, we’re happy with our process for choosing the one we had – and the reasons for choosing it – but we still then have the odd moan or two about it once it’s live and in active use.  And then we start talking with others and begin to wonder what we should do when the current contract is up for renewal.  We want to make sure that the renewal is future-proof.  But what is that future?  Here are my thoughts. Continue reading “The Future of the Learning Management System”

The Future of the Learning Management System

If your LMS was like Amazon

dreamstime_xs_50731317A couple of weeks ago, I tweeted a link to this BBC News article on The Knowledge Academy about Dilshad and Barinder Hothi – joint founders of the international training company, the Knowledge Academy – in which they stated their aim to turn their business into the “Amazon of the education world”.

This immediately reminded me of one of my most recent projects where I scoped out the underpinning concepts and core requirements for a new online corporate university portal.  Here my aim was to create an Amazon-like user experience for learners in order to not only make it easier to make informed decisions about what they wanted to learn, but also to have them come back time and time again to learn more.  I called this “learning stickiness”.

Continue reading “If your LMS was like Amazon”

If your LMS was like Amazon