The New Year’s Resolution Challenge

dreamstime_xs_70220212It’s that time of year when we reflect on the last twelve months and plan for next year.  Many of us will look to set some new year’s resolutions and most likely in the knowledge that they will be hard to keep.

In 2016 some commentators pointed out the home truth that many L&D teams seemed unable to generate the outcomes they sought, despite having the best of intentions and having – quite often – been prepared to announce these publically.  Something, the commentators lamented, seems to constantly hold the profession back from making the desired inroads.

So my challenge to the profession is to make 2017 the year that you try one new thing; and that might be as simple as one project that tries out that one new thing.  Keep it simple, start small…but start!

Here are some of my suggestions. Continue reading “The New Year’s Resolution Challenge”

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The New Year’s Resolution Challenge

Using social and informal learning to meet the five moments of learning need

dreamstime_xs_58382160As I’ve been talking to fellow L&D professionals about their thoughts around social and informal learning – specifically about how they plan on formally integrating these approaches into their learning strategies – it’s been clear to me that there is much excitement about the potential of these methodologies to significantly increase L&D’s capability to support the business.

One of the barriers – if that’s the appropriate word – is the fact that learners don’t necessarily recognise these approaches as “training” and so neglect to make the most of them.  The feeling is that by educating people as to the validity of social and informal learning, there is much scope to use these methods to better leverage workplace learning.

If we are looking to give our learners some pointers to get them started, then perhaps we can look at the “five moments of learning need” framework as our model. Continue reading “Using social and informal learning to meet the five moments of learning need”

Using social and informal learning to meet the five moments of learning need

Using Executive Book Summaries

dreamstime_xs_51938704Executive book summaries have been around for some time now and – thinking about it – were probably one of the first learning resources in the genre that we now call micro-learning.  As a personal user of these, I’m hooked on them and would like to see them used more often to support learning and development.

With the now conscious move by many organisations to adopt learning approaches that blend formal learning with social and informal learning activities, now is the time to look again at where these fit in.  Like the use of most generic learning resources, you do need to invest time and energy to see a return on your investment.

Here are my suggestions. Continue reading “Using Executive Book Summaries”

Using Executive Book Summaries

Behaviours that support social learning

dreamstime_xs_51222044We all recognise that organisational culture has a strong influence on whether social learning truly takes off as a valuable learning approach.  Of course, it often happens quite naturally, so it’s very unlikely an organisation doesn’t have this channel in their mix, but organisational culture can hinder its deeper adoption and restrict its use strategically to meet organisational learning needs.

In my previous post, “Understanding Online Learning Communities“, I referenced one of two pieces of content that had recently appeared in my social learning feeds that I’ve found useful in terms of understanding online learning communities.  Today I’m going to refer to the second.

In his posting, “Developing a Digital Collaborative Culture”, Terence Brake draws on the writings of author, Don Tapscott, to explore four behavioural principles that should be nurtured to enable our learners to become successful digital collaborators.  I’ve looked at these from the perspective of effective participation in social learning. Continue reading “Behaviours that support social learning”

Behaviours that support social learning

Understanding Online Learning Communities

dreamstime_xs_37842290Online communities – often based around a discussion forum – are one of the most cited features in the area of social learning, but they are also some of the most difficult to get established.  Most of us have experience of entering forum ghost towns, with those tell-tale signs that things aren’t too healthy, such as a flurry of activity a few months ago, with nothing since; or lots of questions, but no answers.

Many years ago, when I spoke at a social learning conference I suggested that L&D go where the conversations are already happening, rather than trying to engineer them from scratch; and I’ve seen plenty of examples where that’s worked.  But there will be times when we do need to take the lead, particularly if the business does not have much experience of self-starting virtual collaboration.

There is an increasing body of research that gives us some pointers to creating the right conditions for forums to flourish and coincidentally, over the last few days, two pieces of interesting content have surfaced in my social media feeds that I want to share.  I will cover the first today. Continue reading “Understanding Online Learning Communities”

Understanding Online Learning Communities

Using Digital Learning to Drive Learning Impact

dreamstime_xs_43563469What happens after a piece of training should never be left to chance, but so often it is.  I make no apology for periodically bringing out my soap box to talk about this.  I also call this our industry’s “Achilles heel”.  When survey after survey reveals how our profession still wants that seemingly illusive seat at the top table, we need to acknowledge that if we could demonstrate how our learning made an impact, we’d be in a much stronger bargaining position. Continue reading “Using Digital Learning to Drive Learning Impact”

Using Digital Learning to Drive Learning Impact

Exploring the Social in 70:20:10

dreamstime_xs_40197706We’re all getting used to the much-cited 70:20:10 model and once we’ve firmly acknowledged that we shouldn’t spend any time worrying about the precise ratios, we then need to dig deeper into the detail if we are to recognise where our organisations currently stand and how they need to evolve, if we are aspiring to offer a more balanced approach to learning and development.

Recently I encountered another take on 70:20:10 which has helped me to better analyse this whole topic area. Continue reading “Exploring the Social in 70:20:10”

Exploring the Social in 70:20:10