Using social and informal learning to meet the five moments of learning need

dreamstime_xs_58382160As I’ve been talking to fellow L&D professionals about their thoughts around social and informal learning – specifically about how they plan on formally integrating these approaches into their learning strategies – it’s been clear to me that there is much excitement about the potential of these methodologies to significantly increase L&D’s capability to support the business.

One of the barriers – if that’s the appropriate word – is the fact that learners don’t necessarily recognise these approaches as “training” and so neglect to make the most of them.  The feeling is that by educating people as to the validity of social and informal learning, there is much scope to use these methods to better leverage workplace learning.

If we are looking to give our learners some pointers to get them started, then perhaps we can look at the “five moments of learning need” framework as our model. Continue reading “Using social and informal learning to meet the five moments of learning need”

Advertisements
Using social and informal learning to meet the five moments of learning need

Using Executive Book Summaries

dreamstime_xs_51938704Executive book summaries have been around for some time now and – thinking about it – were probably one of the first learning resources in the genre that we now call micro-learning.  As a personal user of these, I’m hooked on them and would like to see them used more often to support learning and development.

With the now conscious move by many organisations to adopt learning approaches that blend formal learning with social and informal learning activities, now is the time to look again at where these fit in.  Like the use of most generic learning resources, you do need to invest time and energy to see a return on your investment.

Here are my suggestions. Continue reading “Using Executive Book Summaries”

Using Executive Book Summaries

Exploring the Social in 70:20:10

dreamstime_xs_40197706We’re all getting used to the much-cited 70:20:10 model and once we’ve firmly acknowledged that we shouldn’t spend any time worrying about the precise ratios, we then need to dig deeper into the detail if we are to recognise where our organisations currently stand and how they need to evolve, if we are aspiring to offer a more balanced approach to learning and development.

Recently I encountered another take on 70:20:10 which has helped me to better analyse this whole topic area. Continue reading “Exploring the Social in 70:20:10”

Exploring the Social in 70:20:10

From Novice to Expert

dreamstime_xs_43690321In my previous post I looked at how the typical learner learning journey would provide a good steer for facilitating informal and social learning activities as a way to meet many training needs, alongside formal learning, all part of the now popular 70:20:10 model for learning.

There is another way that social and informal learning can support formal learning and that’s to ensure that we deliver the best possible learning experience throughout someone’s career. Continue reading “From Novice to Expert”

From Novice to Expert

Ask. Search. Learn.

dreamstime_xs_55039048I’ve written before about how we need to consider how our learners prefer to learn when designing our learning solutions.  In that piece I concentrated on the amount of effort each learner chooses to put in.

Whilst walking around last week’s Learning Technologies Exhibition in London, the constant referencing to 70:20:10 got me thinking about how we can make sense of that in our organisations and incorporate it into our learning strategies.   After all, informal and social learning is nothing new – and some may argue as it’s been doing all right on its own up to now, why should we even attempt to manage it (or worst case formalise it) – but it got me thinking about how informal, social and formal learning are core components of a learner’s journey.

Continue reading “Ask. Search. Learn.”

Ask. Search. Learn.