Delivering a successful learning report

dreamstime_s_71163608The reporting of learning can easily take over a lot of our time.  Over the last 25 years, I must have encountered every issue and gremlin that can cause reporting difficulties.  I’ve learned to plan reporting up-front and to not leave it as the after-thought and in the first of two posts I outlined some things to consider when developing your own reporting strategy and plan.

In this second post I will focus on the delivery of your reporting approach.  I’ll be sharing the lessons I’ve learned – usually after-the-event – so that you can include them within your own plans.  Forearmed is forewarned, as they say. Continue reading “Delivering a successful learning report”

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Delivering a successful learning report

Developing your learning reporting strategy

dreamstime_s_71163608If there is one facet that has come to define the learning management system (LMS), it’s reporting.  Such is the high demand for data that it’s probably fair to say that a lot of the time that’s been saved delivering learning in a more cost-efficient manner has now been reapportioned to the work needed to collect and report on learning activity and the remedial actions needed to ensure the quality of this data.  Reporting issues top the list of things LMS administrators want to talk about and it’s often a high-level driver when choosing or replacing an LMS.

In my opinion, until we appreciate the scale of learning reporting and start thinking about reporting up-front – rather than as the after-thought once the content is created or the LMS procured – then we will always be chasing our tails.  In this first of two posts, I will look at the need to look at reporting as part of our strategy and planning.  In the second part, I will look at how we deliver our reporting activities. Continue reading “Developing your learning reporting strategy”

Developing your learning reporting strategy

Rethinking compliance training

dreamstime_xs_84033412Love it or loathe it, most of us in L&D will get involved at some time with the design and deployment of compliance training for our organisations.  It’s often the first learning that a new starter experiences and the one piece of learning that distracts all employees every year or so when it comes to refresher time.  Gradually, over time, more and more stakeholders in the organisation believe that their part of the business must have some of its own compliance training that seemingly everyone in the business needs to do.  Eventually, compliance training turns into a mammoth of a beast that consumes extraordinarily large amounts of time and with what results?

“Only 26% think online compliance training is effective” (“The state of compliance training today”, Filtered, 2017)

But it can – and should be – very different. Continue reading “Rethinking compliance training”

Rethinking compliance training

User Experience in Learning

dreamstime_xs_62282700Over the last 18 months, working – for the first time – with experts in user experience (UX), I’ve come to truly appreciate the need to put the learner (our own end-user) at the heart of what we do in L&D.  In our everyday lives, the products and services – at least those that are successful and enduring – have UX at their heart, from the design of the product, through to its packaging and how it’s delivered, be that online or through more traditional approaches. And these brands never stop refining whatever it is they do.  They truly listen to the voice of their users; and when they’ve stopped listening, they’ve faltered.  There is so much we can learn from them.

Continue reading “User Experience in Learning”

User Experience in Learning

Driving a simplicity agenda in L&D

dreamstime_xs_63083788Over the last 14 months, as part of a team creating a new generation learning management system, I’ve come to truly appreciate the need for L&D to strive relentlessly to offer learners simplicity when it comes to their learning.  With hindsight, I will now confess to having developed some amazing learning solutions, but which now look overly complex when it comes to meeting the needs of the modern learner.  Talking to learners – and seeing things afresh through their eyes – has taught me that we, as L&D professionals, need to look again at what we deliver.

Here are some of my thoughts on how we could achieve this. Continue reading “Driving a simplicity agenda in L&D”

Driving a simplicity agenda in L&D

Using 360° Video Virtual Reality to Support Behavioural Skills Training

dreamstime_xs_69476111Over the last seven months, as I’ve researched the use of virtual reality (VR) to support learning and explored its potential with numerous L&D professionals, it’s been really encouraging to see the focus expand from subject areas such as health and safety and employee on-boarding (always a sound starting point) to how VR could be used to support behavioural change programmes.

In part this stems from the power of VR to deliver the concept of “presence”, which – in fact – I maintain should be one of the primary drivers for choosing a VR option.

“Presence” is the sense of becoming someone else, being somewhere else, or interacting with something that’s not actually there.

It’s also down to the fact that the use of 360° video – one of the most straightforward means of getting started with VR – offers a lot of scope to deliver an appropriate immersive experience to support this type of training. Continue reading “Using 360° Video Virtual Reality to Support Behavioural Skills Training”

Using 360° Video Virtual Reality to Support Behavioural Skills Training

The New Year’s Resolution Challenge

dreamstime_xs_70220212It’s that time of year when we reflect on the last twelve months and plan for next year.  Many of us will look to set some new year’s resolutions and most likely in the knowledge that they will be hard to keep.

In 2016 some commentators pointed out the home truth that many L&D teams seemed unable to generate the outcomes they sought, despite having the best of intentions and having – quite often – been prepared to announce these publically.  Something, the commentators lamented, seems to constantly hold the profession back from making the desired inroads.

So my challenge to the profession is to make 2017 the year that you try one new thing; and that might be as simple as one project that tries out that one new thing.  Keep it simple, start small…but start!

Here are some of my suggestions. Continue reading “The New Year’s Resolution Challenge”

The New Year’s Resolution Challenge