Creating Bite-size User-generated Video that Delivers Results: Your 60 Seconds Start Now

dreamstime_xs_50992278I’ve written before about the rise in popularity of video-based learning.  Over the last few years, I’ve seen a rapid increase in the use of both professionally developed and informally produced video content.  At first I was helped along by the wide availability of camcorders and flip-cams.  But over the last two years in particular, the smartphone has become the video-recording tool of choice for many inside and outside of the L&D profession.

At the same time, as the concepts of social and informal learning have been adopted by organisations, the potential to grow the use of user-generated content (UGC) has arisen and excited those in L&D, keen to capture more of the knowledge retained in the heads of employees that would deliver greater value if more widely shared.

But motivating employees to create content is seen as a challenge that might hinder the use of UGC.  If employees see this as a daunting prospect, then all the potential advantages will be lost.  What can we do to realise our ambitions here and what are the implications for learning design and quality? Continue reading “Creating Bite-size User-generated Video that Delivers Results: Your 60 Seconds Start Now”

Creating Bite-size User-generated Video that Delivers Results: Your 60 Seconds Start Now

The impact of virtual reality on learners and learning

dreamstime_xs_51016496Judging by what L&D professionals are telling me, over the next two to three years, we’ll start to see examples of the use of virtual reality (VR) in our field, over and above the current few early experiments in this emerging area of digital learning.

I think it’s fair to say that we have an inkling of how VR could enrich our learning solutions, but with little experience of the application of VR outside of gaming – and with too few vendors yet in a position to translate our ideas into reality – we still have more questions than answers.

One area that is undoubtedly bound to interest us is how VR might suit the learning preferences of individual learners and whether VR will ultimately deliver better learning over the many alternatives.  Given how “new” VR is in our industry, it’s not surprising that there is very little data out there in both points.  In this post I will share what I’ve uncovered so far. Continue reading “The impact of virtual reality on learners and learning”

The impact of virtual reality on learners and learning

Using Virtual Reality to Create an Immersive Learning Experience

dreamstime_xs_55069116Although we are still waiting for virtual reality (VR) to “take off” in learning and development, we already refer to its potential to create a so-called “immersive learning experience”.  And while VR remains in its infancy, we will still carefully weigh up the alternatives, given the challenges of cost, time, a lack of VR design and development skills; and a degree of uncertainty about where it can deliver the greatest returns.

The early adopters have largely focused on high-end 3D solutions that have definitely created an immersive experience and which have suited the learning needs of the defence, medical, mining and engineering industries. But in order to reach a “tipping point”‘, we will need broadened its appeal and look at more simpler forms of VR delivery.

I’m particularly interested in using 360-degree VR to put the learner “in someone else’s shoes” and believe this has the potential to open up the use of VR for more mainstream learning applications. Continue reading “Using Virtual Reality to Create an Immersive Learning Experience”

Using Virtual Reality to Create an Immersive Learning Experience